LAURIS PHILLIPS SUMI-E
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Hermit / 2012

Hermit / 2012

sumi & watercolor  27 x 14 in

$1150

Hermit 2 / 2012

Hermit 2 / 2012

27 x 14 in

$1050

Strut / Tricolored Heron / 2013

Strut / Tricolored Heron / 2013

with handmade raccoon brush, 13 x 13 in

$950

Bird Flies but Does Not Cross / 2014

Bird Flies but Does Not Cross / 2014

with handmade raccoon brush, including silk border 33 x 85

$5250

Calligraphy by Shaku Daijo 

Shaku Daijo is priest of Daishu-in West Rinzai Zen Temple, in Northern California.

A portion of the sale of this folding, framed screen will go to Daishu-in West, with much gratitude for collaboration and teaching.

Bird Flies but Does Not Cross / panel 1 / 2014

Bird Flies but Does Not Cross / panel 1 / 2014

with handmade raccoon brush, including silk border 33 x 17 in

first panel of a 5-panel framed screen, a collaboration with Calligrapher Shaku Daijo.  

Bird Flies but Does Not Cross / panel 2 / 2014

Bird Flies but Does Not Cross / panel 2 / 2014

with handmade raccoon brush, including silk border 33 x 17 in

second panel of a 5-panel framed screen, a collaboration with Calligrapher Shaku Daijo.  

Bird Flies but Does Not Cross / panel 3 / 2014

Bird Flies but Does Not Cross / panel 3 / 2014

with handmade raccoon brush, including silk border 33 x 17 in

third panel of a 5-panel framed screen, a collaboration with Calligrapher Shaku Daijo.  

Bird Flies but Does Not Cross / panel 4 / 2014

Bird Flies but Does Not Cross / panel 4 / 2014

with handmade raccoon brush, including silk border 33 x 17 in

forth panel of a 5-panel framed screen, a collaboration with Calligrapher Shaku Daijo.  

Bird Flies but Does Not Cross / panel 5 / 2014

Bird Flies but Does Not Cross / panel 5 / 2014

fifth panel of a 5-panel framed screen, including silk border 33 x 17 in  

Calligraphy by Shaku Daijo, priest of Daishu-in West Rinzai Zen Temple.  

Pacific Spiny / 2011

Pacific Spiny / 2011

sumi & watercolor, 13 x 18 in

$1050

Pacific Spiny Duet / 2011

Pacific Spiny Duet / 2011

sumi & watercolor, 13 x 18 in

$1050

Double-crested Cormorant / 2013

Double-crested Cormorant / 2013

18 x 13 in

$1050

Slender Crab / 2013

Slender Crab / 2013

with handmade raccoon brush, including silk border 18 x 18

$550

Hop / Reddish Egret / 2013

Hop / Reddish Egret / 2013

with handmade raccoon brush, including silk border 17 x 12 in

$550

SOLD

Skip / Reddish Egret / 2013

Skip / Reddish Egret / 2013

with handmade raccoon brush, including silk border 17 x 12 in

$550

SOLD

Jump / Reddish Egret / 2013

Jump / Reddish Egret / 2013

with handmade raccoon brush, including silk border 17 x 12 in

$550

SOLD

Hop, Skip, Jump / Reddish Egret / 2013

Hop, Skip, Jump / Reddish Egret / 2013

with handmade raccoon brush, triptych including silk border 17 x 36 in

$1500

SOLD

Small Whelk / 2014

Small Whelk / 2014

with handmade weasel brush, including silk border 13 x 9 in

$450

Plicopurpura pansa - underside / 2009

Plicopurpura pansa - underside / 2009

with its own ink & handmade coyote brush,

including silk border 12 x 17 in

$550

a note on Plicopurpura pansa:

 The purple ink you see here is a natural dye secreted by a small sea snail named Plicopurpura pansa

 It lives in the high impact zones of tidal rocky areas of western Mexico and Central America.  It is thought that P. pansa uses this secretion, a neurotoxin, for defense and for disabling other snails before eating them.  It has been used for centuries by native Mexican dyers to color wool for weaving.  They gather the fluid by "milking the snail", which entails taking the critter from its rock at low tide, turning it upside-down and blowing on or poking the operculum until the snail gives up it's milk-like white fluid.  The snail is then put back on its rock, slightly traumatized, but fine. 

 I found P. pansa living in large numbers on the southwest coast of Baja.  My process of collecting the fluid was similar to the traditional dyers, but rather than pour it directly onto a skein of yarn, I poured it into a bottle and took it back to my temporary studio.  By the time I had hassled 100 or so snails, I had about 2 ounces of the "milk".  The fluid was light green by the time I painted with it, then changed to turquoise and finally the delicate purple that you see here, as it dried in the sunlight; a photo-oxidizing dye.

 Out of respect, I painted only "self-portraits" of Plicopurpura pansa with its precious ink. 

Plicopurpura pansa - topside / 2009

Plicopurpura pansa - topside / 2009

with its own ink & handmade coyote brush,

including silk border 12 x 17

$550

a note on Plicopurpura pansa:

The purple ink you see here is a natural dye secreted by a small sea snail named Plicopurpura pansa

 It lives in the high impact zones of tidal rocky areas of western Mexico and Central America.  It is thought that P. pansa uses this secretion, a neurotoxin, for defense and for disabling other snails before eating them.  It has been used for centuries by native Mexican dyers to color wool for weaving.  They gather the fluid by "milking the snail", which entails taking the critter from its rock at low tide, turning it upside-down and blowing on or poking the operculum until the snail gives up it's milk-like white fluid.  The snail is then put back on its rock, slightly traumatized, but fine. 

 I found P. pansa living in large numbers on the southwest coast of Baja.  My process of collecting the fluid was similar to the traditional dyers, but rather than pour it directly onto a skein of yarn, I poured it into a bottle and took it back to my temporary studio.  By the time I had hassled 100 or so snails, I had about 2 ounces of the "milk".  The fluid was light green by the time I painted with it, then changed to turquoise and finally the delicate purple that you see here, as it dried in the sunlight; a photo-oxidizing dye.

 Out of respect, I painted only "self-portraits" of Plicopurpura pansa with its precious ink. 

Brown Pelican / 2011

Brown Pelican / 2011

with handmade coyote brush, including silk border 14 x 12

$550

SOLD

Pelican Lift-off / 2011

Pelican Lift-off / 2011

with handmade coyote brush, including silk border 12 x 18 

$550

Sally Lightfoot / 2014

Sally Lightfoot / 2014

sumi & watercolor with handmade raccoon brush, 18 x 22 in

$950

White Ibis Quintet / 2013

White Ibis Quintet / 2013

with handmade raccoon brush, 14 x 27

$1050

Slender Rock Crab / 2014

Slender Rock Crab / 2014

with handmade raccoon brush, 18 x 22 in

$950

Lift Off / Great Blue Heron / 2011

Lift Off / Great Blue Heron / 2011

with handmade coyote brush

$850

White Ibis Trio / 2013

White Ibis Trio / 2013

with handmade raccoon brush, 14 x 23 in

$1050

Thornback Ray / 2013

Thornback Ray / 2013

with handmade raccoon brush, 14 x 24 in

$850

White Ibis / 2013

White Ibis / 2013

handmade raccoon brush 13 x 14 in

$1050

Hermit / 2012

sumi & watercolor  27 x 14 in

$1150

Hermit 2 / 2012

27 x 14 in

$1050

Strut / Tricolored Heron / 2013

with handmade raccoon brush, 13 x 13 in

$950

Bird Flies but Does Not Cross / 2014

with handmade raccoon brush, including silk border 33 x 85

$5250

Calligraphy by Shaku Daijo 

Shaku Daijo is priest of Daishu-in West Rinzai Zen Temple, in Northern California.

A portion of the sale of this folding, framed screen will go to Daishu-in West, with much gratitude for collaboration and teaching.

Bird Flies but Does Not Cross / panel 1 / 2014

with handmade raccoon brush, including silk border 33 x 17 in

first panel of a 5-panel framed screen, a collaboration with Calligrapher Shaku Daijo.  

Bird Flies but Does Not Cross / panel 2 / 2014

with handmade raccoon brush, including silk border 33 x 17 in

second panel of a 5-panel framed screen, a collaboration with Calligrapher Shaku Daijo.  

Bird Flies but Does Not Cross / panel 3 / 2014

with handmade raccoon brush, including silk border 33 x 17 in

third panel of a 5-panel framed screen, a collaboration with Calligrapher Shaku Daijo.  

Bird Flies but Does Not Cross / panel 4 / 2014

with handmade raccoon brush, including silk border 33 x 17 in

forth panel of a 5-panel framed screen, a collaboration with Calligrapher Shaku Daijo.  

Bird Flies but Does Not Cross / panel 5 / 2014

fifth panel of a 5-panel framed screen, including silk border 33 x 17 in  

Calligraphy by Shaku Daijo, priest of Daishu-in West Rinzai Zen Temple.  

Pacific Spiny / 2011

sumi & watercolor, 13 x 18 in

$1050

Pacific Spiny Duet / 2011

sumi & watercolor, 13 x 18 in

$1050

Double-crested Cormorant / 2013

18 x 13 in

$1050

Slender Crab / 2013

with handmade raccoon brush, including silk border 18 x 18

$550

Hop / Reddish Egret / 2013

with handmade raccoon brush, including silk border 17 x 12 in

$550

SOLD

Skip / Reddish Egret / 2013

with handmade raccoon brush, including silk border 17 x 12 in

$550

SOLD

Jump / Reddish Egret / 2013

with handmade raccoon brush, including silk border 17 x 12 in

$550

SOLD

Hop, Skip, Jump / Reddish Egret / 2013

with handmade raccoon brush, triptych including silk border 17 x 36 in

$1500

SOLD

Small Whelk / 2014

with handmade weasel brush, including silk border 13 x 9 in

$450

Plicopurpura pansa - underside / 2009

with its own ink & handmade coyote brush,

including silk border 12 x 17 in

$550

a note on Plicopurpura pansa:

 The purple ink you see here is a natural dye secreted by a small sea snail named Plicopurpura pansa

 It lives in the high impact zones of tidal rocky areas of western Mexico and Central America.  It is thought that P. pansa uses this secretion, a neurotoxin, for defense and for disabling other snails before eating them.  It has been used for centuries by native Mexican dyers to color wool for weaving.  They gather the fluid by "milking the snail", which entails taking the critter from its rock at low tide, turning it upside-down and blowing on or poking the operculum until the snail gives up it's milk-like white fluid.  The snail is then put back on its rock, slightly traumatized, but fine. 

 I found P. pansa living in large numbers on the southwest coast of Baja.  My process of collecting the fluid was similar to the traditional dyers, but rather than pour it directly onto a skein of yarn, I poured it into a bottle and took it back to my temporary studio.  By the time I had hassled 100 or so snails, I had about 2 ounces of the "milk".  The fluid was light green by the time I painted with it, then changed to turquoise and finally the delicate purple that you see here, as it dried in the sunlight; a photo-oxidizing dye.

 Out of respect, I painted only "self-portraits" of Plicopurpura pansa with its precious ink. 

Plicopurpura pansa - topside / 2009

with its own ink & handmade coyote brush,

including silk border 12 x 17

$550

a note on Plicopurpura pansa:

The purple ink you see here is a natural dye secreted by a small sea snail named Plicopurpura pansa

 It lives in the high impact zones of tidal rocky areas of western Mexico and Central America.  It is thought that P. pansa uses this secretion, a neurotoxin, for defense and for disabling other snails before eating them.  It has been used for centuries by native Mexican dyers to color wool for weaving.  They gather the fluid by "milking the snail", which entails taking the critter from its rock at low tide, turning it upside-down and blowing on or poking the operculum until the snail gives up it's milk-like white fluid.  The snail is then put back on its rock, slightly traumatized, but fine. 

 I found P. pansa living in large numbers on the southwest coast of Baja.  My process of collecting the fluid was similar to the traditional dyers, but rather than pour it directly onto a skein of yarn, I poured it into a bottle and took it back to my temporary studio.  By the time I had hassled 100 or so snails, I had about 2 ounces of the "milk".  The fluid was light green by the time I painted with it, then changed to turquoise and finally the delicate purple that you see here, as it dried in the sunlight; a photo-oxidizing dye.

 Out of respect, I painted only "self-portraits" of Plicopurpura pansa with its precious ink. 

Brown Pelican / 2011

with handmade coyote brush, including silk border 14 x 12

$550

SOLD

Pelican Lift-off / 2011

with handmade coyote brush, including silk border 12 x 18 

$550

Sally Lightfoot / 2014

sumi & watercolor with handmade raccoon brush, 18 x 22 in

$950

White Ibis Quintet / 2013

with handmade raccoon brush, 14 x 27

$1050

Slender Rock Crab / 2014

with handmade raccoon brush, 18 x 22 in

$950

Lift Off / Great Blue Heron / 2011

with handmade coyote brush

$850

White Ibis Trio / 2013

with handmade raccoon brush, 14 x 23 in

$1050

Thornback Ray / 2013

with handmade raccoon brush, 14 x 24 in

$850

White Ibis / 2013

handmade raccoon brush 13 x 14 in

$1050

Hermit / 2012
Hermit 2 / 2012
Strut / Tricolored Heron / 2013
Bird Flies but Does Not Cross / 2014
Bird Flies but Does Not Cross / panel 1 / 2014
Bird Flies but Does Not Cross / panel 2 / 2014
Bird Flies but Does Not Cross / panel 3 / 2014
Bird Flies but Does Not Cross / panel 4 / 2014
Bird Flies but Does Not Cross / panel 5 / 2014
Pacific Spiny / 2011
Pacific Spiny Duet / 2011
Double-crested Cormorant / 2013
Slender Crab / 2013
Hop / Reddish Egret / 2013
Skip / Reddish Egret / 2013
Jump / Reddish Egret / 2013
Hop, Skip, Jump / Reddish Egret / 2013
Small Whelk / 2014
Plicopurpura pansa - underside / 2009
Plicopurpura pansa - topside / 2009
Brown Pelican / 2011
Pelican Lift-off / 2011
Sally Lightfoot / 2014
White Ibis Quintet / 2013
Slender Rock Crab / 2014
Lift Off / Great Blue Heron / 2011
White Ibis Trio / 2013
Thornback Ray / 2013
White Ibis / 2013